Tag Archives: bid protests

GAO: Don’t Just Drop Your Proposed Costs, Explain Them.

The Government Accountability Office (“GAO”) recently published its decision in a two protester challenge to cost realism adjustments made by the Navy during its evaluation of final proposal revisions (“FPRs”) for a base operations and administrative support services contract. In that decision, the GAO affirmed the Navy’s decision to adjust upward the proposed costs in … Continue Reading

GAO Reaffirms Protest Jurisdiction Over “Mixed Transaction” Leases, But Questions Remain

This week, the General Accountability Office (“GAO”) published a decision reaffirming its jurisdiction over protests of “mixed transaction” leases.  Generally, GAO’s protest jurisdiction is limited to the procurement of goods and services, which does not include leases of federally-owned property.  However, in certain circumstances, a transaction involving a lease includes a procurement of goods and … Continue Reading

GAO Bid Protest Filings Increase in FY 2014 But Sustain Rate Declines

On November 18, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released its annual bid protest report for FY 2014.  According to the report, 2,561 cases were filed at GAO in FY 2014, up 5% from last year.  The total of 2,561 includes 2,445 protests, 50 cost claims, and 66 requests for reconsideration.  GAO ruled on 556 cases … Continue Reading

COFC: Not Everything Is “In Connection With A Procurement”

The Court of Federal Claims recently considered the extent to which its Tucker Act bid protest jurisdiction extends to Government “make-or-buy” decisions.  In VFA, Inc. v. United States, No. 14-173 (Fed. Cl. Oct. 21, 2014), VFA protested a Department of Defense (“DOD”) announcement that it would “standardize” the various facility-assessment software tools used by its … Continue Reading

Alleging Agency Bias: Bid Protest Considerations and Open Questions

When a bid protester decides to accuse an agency of bias, there usually are two separate, potentially cross-cutting concerns: (1) how the allegation might impact customer relations; and (2) whether the allegation will have traction at the GAO or the Court of Federal Claims (the “Court”).  A recent opinion by the Court offers some perspective on the … Continue Reading
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