Archives: SAFETY Act

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DHS Cybersecurity Legislation Advances Through Capitol Hill

Earlier this week, both chambers on Capitol Hill took steps that would increase the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) role in the area of cybersecurity.  On the Senate side, the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee approved a DHS reauthorization bill that included amendments to rename and reorganize the DHS National Protection and Programs … Continue Reading

OSAI Issues Guidance on the Government Contractor Defense for Certified Anti-terror Technologies

Congress enacted the SAFETY Act in 2002 in an effort to incentivize the development of anti-terrorism technologies following the attacks of September 11, 2001.  The Act affords liability protections to sellers of Qualified Anti-Terrorism Technologies (“QATTs”) in the event of an act of terrorism where QATTs are deployed.  Although the SAFETY Act’s protections have not … Continue Reading

Lock Down of Nuclear Site:  False Alarm, with a Lesson Learned

Last week the Savannah River Site (“SRS”) in South Carolina, a large nuclear facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (“DOE”), went into a lock down after electronic and canine scans of a commercial delivery truck attempting to enter the facility indicated possible explosive residue on the vehicle.  Fortunately, the lock down was lifted … Continue Reading

OMB Issues New Draft Cyber Guidance for Contractors

On August 11, 2015, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a draft guidance memorandum intended to improve cybersecurity protections in federal acquisitions. Specifically, the proposed memorandum provides direction to federal agencies on “implementing strengthened cybersecurity protections in Federal acquisitions for products or services that generate, collect, maintain, disseminate, store, or provides access to … Continue Reading

SAFETY First: Using the SAFETY Act to Bolster Cybersecurity

We have already seen tremendous fallout from recent cyber attacks on Target, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Sony Pictures, and J.P. Morgan.  Now imagine that, instead of an email server or a database of information, a hacker gained access to the controls of a nuclear reactor or a hospital.  The potential consequences are devastating: … Continue Reading
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