The Trump Administration has declared this month National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, calling on industry associations, law enforcement, private businesses, and others to work toward ending modern slavery and human trafficking. This proclamation follows the Administration’s efforts to combat human trafficking, which we have previously discussed here, and comes on the heels of an OMB memorandum released last fall aimed at “enhanc[ing] the effectiveness of anti-trafficking requirements in Federal acquisition while helping contractors manage and reduce the burden associated with meeting these responsibilities.”

Continue Reading Trump Administration Renews Focus on Anti-Human Trafficking Efforts

Earlier this Fall, the Armed Service Board of Contract Appeals dismissed an appeal for lack of jurisdiction because the certified claim lacked a proper signature. Appeal of NileCo General Contracting LLC, ASBCA No. 60912 (Sept. 22, 2017). This simple oversight proved decisive. Although this case does not chart a new course in Contract Disputes Act (CDA) jurisprudence, it serves as a helpful reminder that the Board’s jurisdiction hinges on compliance with basic requirements. Failing to meet any of those requirements could have significant consequences.
Continue Reading Government Contracts 101 Reminder: Certified Claims Must Include a “Signature”

The Department of State has released its 2017 Trafficking in Persons (“TIP”) Report.  As with prior versions of the annual report, the State Department reviewed efforts made by more than 180 countries to address the minimum Prosecutorial, Protective, and Preventative standards necessary for effective anti-trafficking measures, as these standards are outlined in the United States’ Trafficking Victims Protection Act (“TVPA”).

The release of the report is notable because it can directly impact contractors’ diligence obligations for supply chain review under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (“FAR”) Human Trafficking Rule (located at FAR § 52.222-50).  As we have highlighted in previous articles, for those contractors required to submit compliance plans to the government, such plans should be appropriately shaped to the “nature and scope of activities to be performed for the Government . . .  and the risk that the contract or subcontract will involve services or supplies susceptible to trafficking in persons.”  See FAR § 52.222-50(h)(2)(ii).  Additionally, as set forth in a recent proposed memorandum, which remains the clearest articulation of the government’s views on supply chain diligence obligations to date (covered in a prior post), contractors are expected to take steps to “identify high-risk portions of [their] supply chain[s].”


Continue Reading Department of State Releases 2017 TIP Report

Last Thursday, President Trump and his senior advisors met with representatives of organizations committed to fighting human trafficking. As reported by several news outlets (e.g., AP, NYT, and Reuters), the President stated during the meeting that he would commit the “full force and weight” of the U.S. government against what he views as an “epidemic” of human trafficking around the world.  He explained that he would “direct the Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, and other federal agencies that have a role in preventing human trafficking to take a hard look at the resources and personnel that they are currently devoting to this fight.”  He noted that these agencies “are devoting a lot, but we are going to be devoting more.”  The next day, President Trump appeared to reiterate his commitment on Twitter.

Continue Reading Trump’s Commitment Against Human Trafficking Brings Greater Uncertainty for Contractors

On December 7, the Office of Management and Budget, the Department of Labor, and the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons in the Department of State, issued a proposed memorandum titled “Anti-Trafficking Risk Management Best Practices & Mitigation Considerations.”  The document is intended, at least in part, to “promote clarity and consistency in the implementation of anti-trafficking requirements” imposed by Executive Order 13627, Title XVII of the FY 2013 National Defense Authorization Act, and the implementing regulatory provisions applicable to all federal contractors at FAR 22.17 and FAR 52.222-50.  Although the guidance document is in draft form, it is important for contractors to consider closely because it (1) outlines the government’s contemplated expectations on anti-trafficking risk mitigation, and (2) informs agencies that they may immediately take the contents of the memorandum “into consideration in applying the anti-trafficking requirements in the Federal Acquisition Regulation.”

In addition to reiterating the basic requirements of the anti-trafficking FAR rule (which we have covered in other posts), the memorandum outlines a series of “best practices and mitigation considerations” designed to inform contracting officers’ assessments of whether contractors are effectively carrying out their compliance responsibilities.  Although the guidance states that it is “not intended to augment or otherwise change existing regulatory requirements,” it does specify that, in the event the government becomes aware of a trafficking violation, a contractor’s compliance with the practices identified in the guidance are to be construed as mitigating considerations weighing in the contractor’s favor.  
Continue Reading New Guidance on Contractor Risk Management Under the Human Trafficking Rule Released

On December 3rd, the Department of Justice released its annual summary of recoveries in False Claims Act (FCA) cases.  Although down from last year’s $5.69 billion, this year’s recoveries of $3.5 billion demonstrate the power that the government wields to drive settlements of fraud allegations.  Of the $3.5 billion, $1.1 billion in recoveries are attributable to settlements and judgments in cases alleging false claims for payments under government contracts.  A good portion of these settlements likely were driven by claims of false implied certifications.

For many years, federal courts have grappled with the issue of whether factually accurate claims submitted to the government for payment can nevertheless be “false or fraudulent,” pursuant to an implied certification theory, because of an underlying violation of law.  On December 4th, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in a case that should decide whether this theory of liability is valid.  
Continue Reading High Court to Resolve Split of Authority on “Implied” False Claims