Last month, we discussed Information Technology (IT) Schedule 70, one of the largest contract vehicles administered by the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA). GSA now is evaluating whether Schedule 70 should be made more accessible to certain small contractors, new IT providers, and other, similarly situated firms. Presently, an offeror that responds to the Schedule 70 solicitation—available for download here—must demonstrate at least two (2) years of prior experience providing such products and services. GSA recognizes, however, that this requirement—among others—can be “particularly problematic for small businesses” and is “a barrier for new IT companies.” Accordingly, GSA has issued a new Request for Information (RFI), suggesting changes to the Schedule 70 solicitation that are intended to eliminate the 2-year experience requirement. GSA also is requesting feedback on the following questions:

  1. What would be a benefit to removing the 2-year experience requirement? Or, a concern?
  2. Do any other requirements, processes, or barriers interfere with obtaining a Schedule 70 contract?
  3. Even after the successful receipt of a Schedule 70 award, do any other requirements, processes, or barriers make it difficult to work with the government?

Responses to the RFI are due by 4:00 P.M. EST on September 18, 2015, and should be submitted via e-mail to S70LoweringBarriers@gsa.com.

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Photo of Frederic Levy Frederic Levy

Frederic Levy is one of the nation’s leading suspension and debarment lawyers, focusing his practice on the resolution of complex compliance and ethics issues. He has successfully represented numerous high-profile corporations and individuals under investigation by the government in civil and criminal matters…

Frederic Levy is one of the nation’s leading suspension and debarment lawyers, focusing his practice on the resolution of complex compliance and ethics issues. He has successfully represented numerous high-profile corporations and individuals under investigation by the government in civil and criminal matters, including False Claims Act cases, and in suspension and debarment proceedings to ensure their continued eligibility to participate in federal programs. He has also conducted numerous internal investigations on behalf of corporate clients, particularly in the areas of program fraud and export controls, and often involving sensitive personnel or fiduciary matters. He has also advised corporations in voluntary or mandatory disclosures to a variety of federal agencies. Mr. Levy regularly counsels clients on government contract performance issues, claims and terminations, and he litigates such matters before the boards of contract appeals and in the Federal Circuit.